EMT-B

The Basic Emergency Medical Technician course is an in-depth course in basic life support.

Students learn about acute illnesses, medical emergencies, traumatic emergencies, child birth, rescue extrication, ambulance operations, splinting techniques, communication and documentation, medical legal implications, AED/CPR, basic medications and their effects.

This course combines both classroom lectures and hands on skills labs where actual skills are practiced and performed.

The course involves approximately 160 hours of classroom participation where attendance is mandatory. The course meets or exceeds current National EMS Guidelines.

** This is a computer based course and access to a lap top computer or other media device is required for in and out of class assignments


emt - NCCP

The National Continued Competency Requirements are determined by the NREMT Board of Directors based upon widespread input from EMS researchers, EMS physician and EMS provider stakeholders. This course comprises 50% of the overall requirements necessary to recertify. Topics covered in the NCCP include: Airway, Respiratory, Ventilation, Cardiology, Trauma, Medical and Operations

This 20 hr. course is designed to meet or exceed National and Massachusetts requirements for EMT Basics. This course replaces the previous Massachusetts basic refresher


CPR

Heart Saver/AED:

This program is designed to strengthen the Chain of Survival and provide training on 1 and 2 rescuer adult CPR and Automatic External Defibrillators (AED’s). Responders may include workplace first aid providers, security personnel, lifeguards, or professional firefighters. The program establishes guidelines and protocols in the use of AED’s in accordance with AHA 2015  Guidelines for CPR and ECC.

BLS Healthcare Provider Course:

This course, based on the AHA 2015 guidelines for CPR and ECC, is designed to teach healthcare professionals CPR and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) skills for adult, children and infants. The course also teaches ventilation skills with a barrier device, bag-mask devise, use of oxygen and relief of foreign-body airway obstruction for choking victims. Participants learn these skills through lecture, videos and practical skills scenarios.

ACLS:

This course, based off the AHA 2015 Guidelines for CPR and ECC, is designed to teach the participant advanced cardiac life support procedures.

The course highlights the importance of high-performance team dynamics and communication, systems of care, recognition and intervention of cardiopulmonary arrest, immediate post-cardiac arrest, acute dysrhythmia, stroke, and acute coronary syndromes (ACS)

 Skills taught include:

  • Review of Basic Life Support skills

  • Airway and Ventilation Management

  • AED use

  • Recognition and early management of respiratory and cardiac arrest

  • Recognition and early management of peri-arrest conditions such as Symptomatic bradycardia

  • Related pharmacology

  • Management of ACS and stroke

  • Team Dynamics

  • Fluid Management

  • Defibrillation/Cardioversion

PALS:

This course is based off the AHA 2015 Guidelines for CPR and ECC. Participants will learn the skills necessary to manage critically ill children and infants.

Skills taught include:

  • High-quality Child CPR AED and Infant CPR

  • Recognition of cardiopulmonary arrest and application of CPR

  • Team Dynamics

  • Early interventions for respiratory distress and failure

  • Early interventions for the treatment of shock

  • Recognition of unstable and stable patients with arrhythmias

  • Post–cardiac arrest management

  • Airway/Respiratory Management

  • Fluid Management

  • Defibrillation/Cardioversion

Participants learn these skills through lecture, videos and practical skills scenarios.


 

Paramedic

Course Description:

The EMT-Paramedic program is designed to prepare the student to achieve the highest level of certification for a pre-hospital provider. The course consists of an overall length of approximately 18 months. This includes approximately (12) months of didactics, skills lab sessions, skills scenario evaluations and clinical internship. The clinical internship consists of (350) hours clinical skills with an assigned hospital preceptor where the student will start to apply the knowledge and skills that have been learned in a live patient setting. The clinical internship will be followed by a (250) hour field internship where you will ride on an EMS unit with an experienced Paramedic preceptor to further build upon the assessment, management and treatment skills developed during your classroom and clinical experiences and apply them to the out-of-hospital setting as a provider and team leader. At the conclusion of the program you must be able to demonstrate, through testing and evaluation, the competencies and skills required of the entry-level EMT-Paramedic.

Course Design:

The design of this program is based off the EMT-Paramedic National Standard Curriculum. The program consists of four components of instruction: didactic – skills laboratory/scenarios – clinical internship – capstone field internship. The didactic, skills laboratory, scenarios and clinical internship occur concurrently. After successful completion of these components the student will move onto the capstone field internship. After successful completion of the four components the student will meet with the Program and Medical Directors to review and evaluate their terminal competencies in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective learning domains.

Course Length:

The emphasis of Paramedic education is based on the competence of the graduate, not the amount of education that they receive. The time involved in educating a paramedic student to an acceptable level of competence depends on many variables. The average paramedic program consists of 1000-1200 hours of instruction. This program consists of approximately 1200 hours of instruction over approximately 18 months. Course length, however, may vary according to a number of factors including, but not limited to:

·         The student’s basic academic skills competence

·         Student motivation

·         The student’s prior emergency/health care experience

·         Prior academic achievements

·         Clinical/Field/Academic resources available

Course Hours Breakdown:

  • Didactic: 320 hours

  • Skills Laboratory: 294 hours

  • Clinical Internship: 350 hours

  • Field Internship: 250 hours

  • Total Hours: approx. 1,200 hours

Note: These hours are the minimum recommendations. Revisions to these hours may be required according to the student or course needs in order to achieve the competence of the program graduate.

** This is a computer based course and access to a lap top computer or other media device is required for in and out of class assignments


Paramedic - NCCR

The National Continued Competency Requirements are determined by the NREMT Board of Directors based upon widespread input from EMS researchers, EMS physician and EMS provider stakeholders. The NCCR comprises 50% of the overall requirements necessary to recertify. Topics in the NCCR are chosen among the following: evidence based medicine, any changes in the National EMS Scope of Practice Model, science related position papers that affect EMS patient care, topics which cover patient care tasks that have low frequency yet high criticality, and articles which improve knowledge to deliver patient care.

The NREMT will provide the educational materials for this component to the EMS community as part of their mission to protect the public.

This replaces the 48 Hour Refresher of previous years

12- Lead ECG

Basic: A complete basic 12 lead course that starts with a simplified overview of cardiac conduction system function and goes through normal and abnormal EKG patterns and ACLS applications. No jargon, just plain, clear information to build real clinical skills. You will learn to recognize and understand normal and abnormal EKG strips. You will practice recognition and analysis of EKG strips as you gain understanding of the common EKG rhythms. It can also help you develop skills to make the EKG portion of ACLS certification go a lot smoother.

Advanced: The skills from Basic 12 lead EKG are reviewed to help you develop confidence and speed with many new tracings. Clinical implications are emphasized. New concepts include: blocked PACs, PACs with aberrant conduction, SVT with aberrancy, atrial tachycardia with block, new variations on the classic AV blocks, fusion beats, the Pacemaker Code, and reentry – including WPW.